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Fetal growth restriction causes

Causes of Fetal Growth Restriction FGR has many possible causes. A common cause is a problem with the placenta. The placenta is the tissue that joins the mother and fetus, carrying oxygen and.. Fetal Growth Restriction. The most common definition of fetal growth restriction is a fetal weight that is below the 10th percentile for gestational age as determined through an ultrasound. This can also be called small-for-gestational-age (SGA) or intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) Practice Essentials Fetal growth restriction (FGR) refers to a condition in which a fetus is unable to achieve its genetically determined potential size. This functional definition seeks to.. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a condition in which an unborn baby (fetus) is smaller than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy (gestational age). It's often described as an estimated weight less than the 10th percentile. This means that the baby weighs less than 9 out of 10 babies of the same gestational age

Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR) - WebM

Fetal Growth Restriction American Pregnancy Associatio

  1. One common cause of FGR is a problem with the placenta. For example, if the placenta fails to get enough oxygen and nutrients to the baby or if the placenta's blood supply is impaired, he may grow at a slower rate. Other babies with FGR have conditions like chromosomal abnormalities or heart defects, which can limit their growth
  2. Symmetrical intrauterine growth restriction is a type of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) where all fetal biometric parameters tend to be less than expected (below the 10 th percentile) for the given gestational age. Both length and weight parameters are reduced. Please, refer to the article on asymmetrical intrauterine growth restriction for a particular discussion of this other type of.
  3. Adverse intrauterine conditions beginning in the early pregnancy (first trimester) that may cause fetal nutrient restriction, such as smoking, cocaine use, chronic hypertension, anemia, and chronic diabetes mellitus, may result in symmetrical FGR. Chromosome anomalies, such as aneuploidy, are a major cause of symmetrical FGR
  4. What can cause FGR? Generally, growth restriction is associated with maternal risk factors, fetal anomalies, or a problem with the placenta - and sometimes a combination of these situations. Some risk factors can be controlled, and some cannot. Maternal risk factors. Some of the most common maternal risk factors for FGR include
  5. This can lead to growth restriction in the fetus and high blood pressure in the mother, called preeclampsia, which may cause preterm birth, neonatal complications, neurological abnormalities and even stillbirth. Certain women are at greater risk for placental dysfunction, including those with high blood pressure, diabetes and/or anemia
  6. Objectives: One of the causes of intrauterine fetal growth restriction (FGR) can be pathology of the placenta
  7. What Causes Fetal Growth Restriction Fetal growth restriction is most often caused by a problem with transport of nutrients and oxygen from the mother's blood to the baby, via the placenta. Inadequate blood flow to the placenta in the uterine arteries is the underlying abnormality in many cases. This is called utero-placental insufficiency

Tommy's PregnancyHub Fetal growth restriction (Intrauterine growth restriction) Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a condition where a baby is smaller than expected or when a baby's growth slows or stops during pregnancy. It is also called intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) Fetal growth restriction is one of the most significant causes of perinatal morbidity and mortality in developed countries. In rat models, the increase in secondary intracellular messengers improves uterine arterial and fetoplacental perfusion, ameliorating fetal growth restriction Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) refers to poor growth of a fetus while in the mother's womb during pregnancy. The causes can be many, but most often involve poor maternal nutrition or lack of adequate oxygen supply to the fetus

Fetal Growth Restriction: Practice Essentials, Causes of

Fetal Growth Restriction - Health Encyclopedia

IUGR/SGA is usually end results of maternal, placental, fetal and genetic causes. With the advance of molecular biology, the list genetic cause of IUGR is increasing and these genetic causes include maternal, placental and fetal genes. Several metabolic and endocrinal causes are also responsible to cause IUGR If growth restriction is severe, assessment for chromosomal abnormality would need to be considered in both instances. The degree of deviation is more important than the symmetry between abdominal and head measurements. Studies comparing symmetrical and asym-metrical growth restriction have failed to demonstrate differences in aetiology,7 fetal Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a condition that occurs due to various reasons, is an important cause of fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. It has been defined as a rate of fetal growth that is less than normal in light of the growth potential of that specific infant The aim of the present collection Causes and Consequences of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) was to bring together the many causes for fetal growth restriction, and to describe the consequences of predisposition toward various diseases in later life. The 21 contributions, both reviews and original research papers, include basic.

Cause and severity of FGR Counseling Monitoring fetal growth and wellbeing Optimal time for and route of delivery. preeclampsia, decelerating fetal growth, severe growth restriction, increasing umbilical artery Doppler index) Daily if absent or reversed end diastolic flow Slow fetal growth, widely known as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a condition that signifies that a baby is growing more slowly than a normal baby while in the womb during pregnancy. The baby's weight will be lesser than it ought to when compared with a normal growing baby in the same gestational period The most common definition of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) is a fetal weight that is below the 10th percentile for gestational age as determined through an ultrasound. Intrauterine Growth Restriction is also known as Small-for-Gestational-Age (SGA) or fetal growth restriction Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) Babies come in all sizes. Some are just naturally larger or smaller than others. But in certain cases, babies in the womb are smaller than they should be. When this happens, it is called intrauterine growth restriction, or IUGR. About IUG Selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR) occurs when there is unequal placental sharing which leads to suboptimal growth of one twin. In cases of sIUGR, the estimated fetal weight of the smaller, growth-restricted twin usually falls below the 10th percentile. This will usually result in more than a 25 percent weight difference between.

References. Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), which is defined as less than 10 percent of predicted fetal weight for gestational age, may result in significant fetal morbidity and mortality. However, low fluid level (also termed as oligohydramnios) can lead to fetal growth restriction . Various factors, including the health of the mother, certain medications, and a slight rupture of the amniotic sac cause the fluid levels to deplete

Fetal growth restriction is the second leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality, followed only by prematurity.1, 2 The incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is estimated to. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a term used to describe a condition in which the fetus (unborn baby) is smaller in size than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy which means it is not growing at a normal rate inside the womb. This can also be called small-for-gestational-age (SGA) or fetal growth restriction Placental dysfunction is a pregnancy complication in which the placenta, which delivers oxygen and nutrients into the fetal bloodstream, fails to properly support a developing fetus. This can lead to growth restriction in the fetus and high blood pressure in the mother, called preeclampsia, which may cause preterm birth, neonatal complications. Being born small lays the foundation for short-term and long-term implications for life. Intrauterine or fetal growth restriction describes the pregnancy complication of pathological reduced fetal growth, leading to significant perinatal mortality and morbidity, and subsequent long-term deficits. Placental insufficiency is the principal cause of FGR, which in turn underlies a chronic.

Fetal Growth Restriction Cedars-Sina

Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is the final manifestation of a variety of maternal, fetal, and placental conditions. Fetal growth restriction occurs in up to 10% of pregnancies and is second to premature birth as a cause of infant morbidity and mortality Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is most often defined as an estimated fetal weight less than the 10th percentile for gestational age by prenatal ultrasound evaluation. The condition is associated with a number of short-term and long-term complications that can severely impact the quality of life Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is used interchangeably with the term fetal growth restriction. IUGR describes a fetus who is smaller than expected and is potentially at risk for health complications. IUGR is different from small for gestational age, which is defined as a weight that is less than then 10th percentile for any given. Fetal smallness diagnosed in later gestation is much more common (see Chapter 23) and is usually associated with lower mortality compared to early-onset growth restriction, but still faces significant perinatal morbidity and the risk of late stillbirth.Differential diagnoses of causes here include primarily SGA, the constitutionally small baby, and, less often, a true late presentation.

Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR), Intrauterine Growth

Fetal growth restriction is then diagnosed based on collected measurements, which are compared to average growth rates at their gestational age. Additionally, your doctor could suggest a Doppler ultrasound to examine the placenta, umbilical cord, and blood flow Early onset fetal growth restriction (FGR) may be due to impaired placentation, environmental or toxic exposure, congenital infections or genetic abnormalities. Remarkable research, mainly based on retrospective series, has been published on the diverse genetic causes. Those have become more and more relevant with the improvement in the. What causes low birthweight? The primary cause is premature birth, being born before 37 weeks gestation; a baby born early has less time in the mother's uterus to grow and gain weight, and much of a fetus's weight is gained during the latter part of the mother's pregnancy.. Another cause of low birthweight is intrauterine growth restriction. This occurs when a baby does not grow well in utero. to have fetal growth restriction. What causes Growth Restriction? There are many possible causes of growth restriction. Apart from genetic abnormalities of the baby, there are several medical conditions that a woman may have that could contribute to IUGR. For example, maternal age over 40 years, smoking, other substance abuse (alcohol Fetal growth restriction (FGR) remains a leading contributor to perinatal mortality and morbidity and metabolic syndrome in later life. Recent advances in ultrasound and Doppler have elucidated several mechanisms in the evolution of the disease. However, consistent classification and characterization regarding the severity of FGR is lacking

Causes of Fetal Growth Restriction. Fetal growth restriction can be caused by problems with the placenta, which carries nutrients to the baby. It also can be related to health problems in the mother, such as advanced diabetes, high blood pressure, infections, smoking or excessive alcohol use. Chromosomal defects may also be a factor The causes of pathologic fetal growth restriction can be divided into: fetal, maternal, and placental explanations: Fetal causes of intrauterine growth restriction include: aneuploidy (fetus has too many or too few chromosomes), anatomic malformations (most commonly cardiac), or fetal infection with microbes such as cytomegalovirus (CMV. The causes of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are multifactorial with both intrinsic and extrinsic influences. While many studies focus on the intrinsic pathological causes, the possible long-term consequences resulting from extrinsic intrauterine physiological constraints merit additional consideration and further investigation. Infants with IUGR can exhibit early symmetric or late.

Asymmetrical intrauterine growth restriction is a type of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) where some fetal biometric parameters are disproportionately lower than others, as well as falling under the 10 th percentile. The parameter classically affected is the abdominal circumference (AC).. Please, refer to the article on symmetrical intrauterine growth restriction for a particular. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a common complication of pregnancy, resulting in a fetus that fails to reach its genetically determined growth potential. Whilst the fetal cardiovascular response to acute hypoxia is well established, the fetal defence to chronic hypoxia is not well understood due to experiment constraints. Growth restriction results primarily from reduced oxygen and nutrient. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) refers to poor growth of a fetus while in the mother's womb during pregnancy.The causes can be many, but most often involve poor maternal nutrition or lack of adequate oxygen supply to the fetus.. At least 60% of the 4 million neonatal deaths that occur worldwide every year are associated with low birth weight (LBW), caused by intrauterine growth. For the growth of the baby to proceed as normal, a placenta that functions as normal is crucial. If the placenta fails to function, fetal growth restriction (FGR) may occur. Evidence suggests that in normal pregnancies, the baby is able to signal to the mother to alter the amount of nutrients getting across, via the placenta

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR): Symptoms, Causes

  1. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a condition in which an unborn baby (fetus) is smaller than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy (gestational age). It is often described as an estimated weight less than the 10th percentile. This means that the baby weighs less than 9 out of 10 babies of the same gestational age. Newborn babies with FGR may be calle
  2. Fetal causes contd..3. Structural Anomalies- All major structural defects involving CNS,CVS,GIT, Genitourinary and musculoskeletal system are associated with increased risk of fetal growth restriction. If growth restriction is associated with polyhydramnios, the incidence of structural anomaly is substantially increased. 22. Fetal causes contd.
  3. Fetal growth restriction occurs in up to 10% of pregnancies and is a cause of infant morbidity and mortality around the world. Fetuses <10th%ile at any gestational age have a risk of stillbirth of 1.5%, which is 2x the rate of fetuses with normal growth
  4. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a term used to describe a condition in which the fetus is smaller than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy. Another term for IUGR is fetal growth restriction. Newborn babies with IUGR are often described as small for gestational age. A fetus with IUGR often has an estimated fetal weight less.
  5. utes. Depending on the results of these tests, your baby may need to be delivered early. After delivery, the newborn's growth and development depends on the severity and cause of IUGR. Discuss the baby's outlook with your providers
  6. Keywords: Fetal Doppler, Fetal complications, Iatrogenic preterm delivery, Antenatal counseling, Neonatal intensive care unit Background Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is both a common obstetric condition and a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality [1, 2]. Early FGR by definition is diagnosed at o
  7. Low birthweight is when a baby is born weighing less than 5 pounds, 8 ounces. Some low-birthweight babies are healthy, but others have serious health problems that need treatment. Premature birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) and fetal growth restriction are the most common causes of low birthweight. Being a person of color is not a cause for.

Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR) in Pregnancy: Symptoms

Placental insufficiency, in some form or fashion, is associated with the majority of cases of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). There are numerous causes of IUGR which are not caused primarily by placental insufficiency, but indirectly lead to it. The causes of IUGR can be subdivided into fetal and maternal etiologies The causes of fetal growth restriction can be divided into two categories: Placenta mediated growth restriction; Non-placenta mediated growth restriction, where the baby is small due to a genetic or structural abnormality . Placenta mediated growth restriction refers to conditions that affect the transfer of nutrients across the placenta.

For the purposes of this study, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) was given as the cause of death for cases in which an antenatal diagnosis of IUGR was documented and in which surveillance was ongoing; cases in which placental pathology of maternal vascular malperfusion or other definite fetal growth restriction (FGR)-associated pathology. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) (also referred to as fetal growth restriction, or FGR) describes a condition in which the unborn baby is smaller than expected for his or her gestational age, or the number of weeks that the baby has been in the uterus. The term for a newborn baby who is smaller than expected is small for gestational age. We conclude that restriction of fetal growth by placental insufficiency induces alterations in the lungs and chest wall that result in persistent impairments in respiratory function during early. Causes of fetal growth restriction can be grouped into what three categories:-Hx of a previous fetus with IUGR -Significant maternal hypertension -Smoking-The presence of a uterine anomaly (bicornuate or fibroids)-Significant placental hemorrhage. Most significant maternal factors include 6 Introduction Fetal growth restriction (FGR), which has affected in 2010 more than 32 million newborns and 27% of all births in low and middle income countries, is one of the most common causes of disabilities in children and adults (Black et al., 2013)

Theory of fetal programming contributes to a better understanding of the relationship of many human diseases with antenatal period pathology. Regulatory impact of nervous system is of great importance. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is a convenient model for investigation of the abnormalities of fetal neurodevelopment. Fetal heart rate variability is a well-known approach for fetal autonomic. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is defined as a rate of fetal growth that is less than normal for the growth potential of a specific infant. An enormous number and variety of established and possible causes have been identified. Potentially, any aberration of biological activity in the fetus can lead to growth failure MF/placental factors: Maternal-fetal and placental etiologies can all cause fetal growth restriction. Severa fetal syndromes can lead to fgr (e.g. Down, patau, triploidy, edwards, noonan's, digeorge). Multifetal pregnancies are at increased risk for fgr; this can result in fetal demise, fetal brain injury, cerebral palsy or even normal outcomes in non-syndromic cases

Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) The common definition of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) (also known as fetal growth restriction) is a fetus with estimated fetal weight (EFW) <5−10 th percentile for gestational age. Another definition is estimated fetal weight is <2,500 grams Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common complication of pregnancy in developing countries, and carries an increased risk of perinatal mortality and morbidity. IUGR refers to a condition in which foetus (an unborn baby) is smaller or less developed than normal for the baby's gender and gestational age Slow fetal growth is also known as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), which refers to a condition signifying the slow growth of a baby during pregnancy. Even after taking proper care, your fetus may grow slowly. In this case, the baby is smaller than the average size at that stage of your pregnancy The term Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR) or Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) are used to describe when the fetus does not reach full growth potential.This is usually determined by clinical sonography calculations of fetal weight, fetal size, or symmetry. The fetal period (weeks 9 to 37) is about four times the length of the embryonic period and the clinical term may not relate directly.

What causes fetal growth restriction? Some of the underlying causes of FGR include the following: Placental insufficiency—when the placenta fails to provide adequate nutrition to the developing fetus. Fetal abnormality—some fetal abnormalities are associated with delayed growth Growth retardation occurs when your fetus doesn't develop at a normal rate. It's widely referred to as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). The term intrauterine growth retardation is also. statement: detection and management of fetal growth restriction in singleton pregnancies. Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth. Brisbane, Australia, September 2019. Key messages Improving detection of Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR) is an important strategy to reduce stillbirth

Intrauterine Growth Restriction Symptoms And Dealing WithPin on BabyCare101

Fetal growth restriction is when the fetal weight is below the 10th percentile for gestational age which can be determined through an ultrasound test. This can also be called as small-for gestational age (SGA) or intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Different types of Fetal Growth Restriction INTRODUCTION. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is defined as the failure of a fetus to attain its full genetic growth potential. It is a leading cause of stillbirth, prematurity, cerebral palsy and perinatal mortality Reference McIntire, Bloom, Casey and Leveno 1.Small size at birth increases surviving infants' lifelong risk of adverse health outcomes associated with the metabolic syndrome. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a term used to describe a condition in which the fetus is smaller than expected for the number of weeks of pregnancy. Another term for IUGR is fetal growth restriction. Newborn babies with IUGR are often described as small for gestational age (SGA). A fetus with IUGR often has an estimated fetal weight. Causes. All told, about one in every four stillbirths will be unexplained. Of those with a diagnosed cause, the most common will include: Congenital birth defects. Genetic abnormalities. Placental abruption and other placental disorders (such as vasa previa) Placental dysfunction leading to fetal growth restriction IUGR is estimated to occur in approximately 5 to 7 percent of infants born in the United States, a statistic that includes both alcohol-induced growth deficiencies and those that are due to other causes. Those impacts on gestational growth can be fetal, maternal, or placental in origin, and can result from chromosomal abnormalities in the fetus.

Cause and Risk Factors. Intrauterine growth restriction occurs in an estimated 5 percent of pregnancies. The condition can be caused by maternal, fetal, placental or genetic problems. Possible causes and risk factors include: Placental insufficiency (placenta is unable to deliver adequate oxygen and nutrients to the baby Intrauterine growth restriction (sometimes called intrauterine growth retardation, or simply IUGR) is a blanket term used to describe babies that experience poor growth in the uterus and are in the bottom tenth percentile for fetal weight—meaning that 90 percent of babies of the same gestational age weigh more than that baby does Babies diagnosed with fetal growth restriction (FGR) face additional, unique challenges that can make their early lives a little more complicated. FGR is characterized by slow or halted fetal growth, and it is associated with an increased risk of premature birth, development problems, and stillbirth About 40 years ago, doctors recognized for the first time that the restriction of fetal growth was a phenomenon that not only affected animals, but also human beings. In 1961, Warkani and Cabbage informed of weight, longitude and cephalic circumference values in children and they defined retardation of fetal growth

In fetal causes of IUGR, the low growth may be due to genetic abnormalities, metabolic defects which prevent the proper functioning of various systems, or the presence of infections in. Babies are diagnosed with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) if they appear to be smaller than expected. This would happen if an ultrasound indicates that the baby's weight is below the 10th percentile for their gestational age (weeks of pregnancy). It's also called fetal growth restriction (FGR). There are lots of reasons why a baby might. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is both a common obstetric condition and a major cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality [1, 2].Early FGR by definition is diagnosed at or below 32 weeks and differs from late onset FGR also in terms of its clinical manifestations, association with hypertension [], patterns of deterioration and severity of placental dysfunction [4, 5] Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), sometimes called fetal growth restriction (FGR) or small for gestational age (SGA), is a condition in which an unborn baby's growth is too slow. IUGR can be caused by problems with the placenta or uterus, as well as underlying maternal or fetal health issues (1)

Fetal growth defect is classified into intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) fetus based on the estimated fetal weight percentile and Doppler hemodynamic parameters. IUGR pathophysiology and etiology are complex and diverse, highlighting placental insufficiency as a paradigm, which explains its association with other entities of great clinical importance. Restriction of the mother's blood flow through the placenta is the most common cause of placental insufficiency. Any restriction can have a serious effect upon fetal growth and development. Placental damage can cause restriction - damage for example caused by infarction (tissue death) or the separation from the uterine wall ( placenta abruption )

Anoxia and Hypoxia | Birth Injury Guide

fetal growth and development during late gestation, as well as maturity of oocytes, duration of estrus, and both implantation and placentation of conceptuses in uteri of sows. Understanding the physiological changes related to initiation and progress of intrauterine growth restriction in fetal pigs: Causes and |.. Definition and Epidemiology of Intrauterine Growth Restriction. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) or IUGR has been defined as a fetal weight which is less than 10% of the predicted weight for the gestational age.. Although the usual definition of FGR mentions a fetal birth weight less than the 10 th percentile, studies have found that about a quarter of the infants under the 10 th percentile have.

Fetal Growth and Weight Percentile Ultrasound Pregnancy

fetal death reported in the literature are highly variable because of differences in the populations studied. Many of these etiologies are also interdependent, for example, uteroplacental insufficiency is related to maternal hypertension and fetal growth restriction. Table 4 The major pathologic processes that cause fetal death ar Sometimes that happens because the parents aren't that big. Sometimes it happens because the baby is just not destined to be a great big baby, but sometimes fetal growth restriction, also called intrauterine growth restriction, can have more significant causes. One of the major categories of causes of growth restriction is congenital or genetic Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is challenging because of the difficulties in reaching a definitive diagnosis of the cause and planning management. FGR is associated not only with a marked increased risk in perinatal mortality and morbidity but also with long-term outcome risks. Combinations of fetal biometry, amniotic fluid volume, heart rate patterns, arterial and venous Doppler, and. Abi Habib, W., Brioude, F., Edouard, T. et al. Genetic disruption of the oncogenic HMGA2-PLAG1-IGF2 pathway causes fetal growth restriction. Genet Med 20, 250-258 (2018. Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is the major single cause of stillbirth 1 and is also associated with neonatal morbidity and mortality 2,3, impaired health and educational achievement in childhood.

Intrauterine Growth Retardation - baby, symptoms, stages

measurement, the underlying cause of intrauterine growth restriction may be established by an enhanced ultrasound examination to include a detailed review of fetal anatomy, placental morphology, and Doppler studies of the uterine and umbilical arteries. (II-2A) 11. In cases of intrauterine growth restriction, determinatio **While diabetes can cause restricted fetal growth, it typically causes excessive growth resulting in a fetus who is large for gestation age (LGA). Approach to IUGR: Accurate dating of the pregnancy is essential! Dating is estimated based on the last menstrual period using Nägele's rule (estimated due date = LMP - 3 months + 7 days) Intrauterine Growth Restriction and Intrauterine Fetal Death Author: Madhavi Last modified by: Madhavi Created Date: 10/27/2010 12:30:53 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show (4:3) Other title Preeclampsia ( which is the cause of 15% of premature births) can result in the baby being born very small (known as fetal growth restriction). Fetal growth restriction MAY have the following complications: learning disabilities. epilepsy. cerebral palsy

Selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR) is a fetal condition that causes identical twins to grow at different rates inside the womb. Our high-risk pregnancy doctors diagnose and treat this and other rare conditions that affect mothers and unborn babies Fetal distress can occur during pregnancy, or more. commonly during labour. Fetal Distress can be due to a wide range of reasons. The. main cause of antepartum fetal distress is. uteroplacental insufficiency. Reduced liquor volume, maternal hypovolemic and fetal. growth restriction are known associations Previously, we have shown that vaginal ZIKV infection of pregnant female mice at various gestational time points led to fetal growth restriction and infection of the fetal brain . We, and other groups, have shown that a ZIKV infection of male mice causes testicular damage due to persistent virus replication within this organ [ 4-6 ] The definition of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a problematic one because we do not know the inherent growth potential of the fetus. The most common definition used is fetal weight below the 10th percentile for gestational age. The preferred method for evaluating intrauterine growth retardation (intrauterine growth restriction; IUGR) is ultrasonographic examination